New Discovery

This last month has been one of great personal discovery. My new-found love of Dunkin Donuts notwithstanding, I have found an even greater discovery: There is an EINSTEIN'S BAGELS just ONE MILE FROM MY HOUSE!!!!

This may not sound like a big deal, but it's pretty huge in Ryan world. After finding it last night, I resolved to return there this morning (which I did) and purchased a delicious Java Choco Coffee and a bagel. Sadly, I seem to have lost my penchant for bagels (I prefer now Enlish Muffins) but the coffee was lovely. It's the simple things in life that keep me going...

So let's see what's new. I'm heading off to Nashville on Friday which is very exciting. This tends to be a really fun feis so I'm hoping to enjoy myself. I'm also playing the Norton-Healy feis in two weeks and, although I'm looking forward to it, it's not so climactic insofar as it's here in Chicago and I don't get to travel anywhere exotic (oh, for the good ol'days of feising!).

We've just completed the mid-unit review of CPE. Mid-Unit already! Tomorrow concludes our sixth week of group meaning that I've only four more weeks to go. As much as I love this experience, I will be the first to admit that the 3 hours and 15 minutes of group three times per week is excessive and draining. I love seeing patients - it's the best part of my job. And I learn by doing - I learned to teach by teaching, to cook by cooking, etc. And while I think reflection can inform and assist in this learning process, I don't seem to be finding such learning taking place in a way that is extremely helpful. Ah well, it's all part of the experience. Just so long as I get to visit with patients and families, I'm happy.

Here's my ministry thought for today:

In John's gospel, the first words out of Jesus' mouth are "What are you looking for?" This is a great question! Too often our temptation is to push or prod others into doing what we want them to do. This happens all the time - just think of how many parents force their kids into certain activities or, more distressing, force their children into particular majors at school. But it happens everywhere, I suspect, and it's easy for this to take place in a hospital where many people are not 'at their best.'

So what I've found helpful is to try to incarnate this question by being attentive to the desires of those I meet with each day. I listen carefully to what the person seems to desire - information, words of comfort, presence - and I seek to meet that need. It's not my place to force care upon him or her, but it is my job to seek actively the way I might best serve needs.

I'd reflect more on this, but I have to go to work. I want to get to mass and then write up my third verbatim, followed by group and then I'm on-call this evening until 9:00.
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